race

Tues 7.21.15 | Richard Pryor

Scott Saul, Becoming Richard Pryor Harper, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

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Iconoclastic comedian, talented actor, and gifted writer Richard Pryor pushed the boundaries of popular culture at a pivotal moment, laying bare uncomfortable truths about race and injustice in America. Scott Saul reflects on the comedian's formative years in a segregated country and the fluorescence of his art during a time of urban unrest, Black Power, and the counterculture of the 1960s and '70s.

Wed 5.27.15 | Probing “The Wire”

Linda Williams, On The Wire Duke U. Press, 2014

 

 

 

 

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The Wire clearly wasn't your typical police drama. Linda Williams describes the way in which the critically acclaimed television serial about the streets and institutions of Baltimore broke new ground. Among other things, Williams highlights The Wire's institutional focus and argues that the show rewrote what she calls the melodrama of black and white.

Tues 4.21.15 | African Americans and the Environment

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Why are African Americans missing from our collective imagery of the environment and environmentalism?  Cultural geographer Carolyn Finney discusses both the history of African Americans and nature -- as it's defined in the United States -- and the history of African American environmentalism, separating myth from fact.

Mon 4.13.15 | Black Slaves, Indians, and the US Colonial Project

Barbara Krauthamer, Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South UNC Press, 2013

Alyosha Goldstein, ed., Formations of United States Colonialism Duke U. Press, 2014

Willis and Krauthamer, Envisioning Emancipation Temple U. Press, 2013

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Notions of racial hierarchy abounded in the early nineteenth century as missionaries tried to convert Native Americans, federal officials sought to seize Indian lands, and Indians in the southern US bought, sold, and owned black slaves. Barbara Krauthamer relates what happened when people of different races, agendas, and social status encountered one another in the shadow of the US colonial project.

Tues 3.24.15 | A. Philip Randolph, Black Socialist

Eric Arnesen

Kersten and Lang, eds., Reframing Randolph: Labor, Black Freedom, and the Legacies of A. Philip Randolph NYU Press, 2015

Eric Arnesen, Brotherhoods of Color Harvard U. Press, 2001

Eric Arnesen, The Black Worker U. of Illinois Press, 2007

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A. Philip Randolph famously led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, but he did much more than that. Eric Arnesen traces Randolph's emergence as a militant socialist at a time when few Blacks were attracted to the Socialist Party and its emphasis on class. Arnesen also discusses Randolph's relationship with Eugene Debs and W. E. B. Du Bois.

Wed 3.18.15 | We Are All Criminals

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People with criminal records are, too often, written off by society. Is that fair, asks Emily Baxter, given that we've all violated the law at one time or another? Baxter's project collects and disseminates the stories of crimes people got away with, often because of their class or race privilege. (Encore presentation.)

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