race

Wed 8.26.15 | Race, Privilege, and Food Justice

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Food justice activists sometimes set up gardens in low-income communities. Margaret Ramírez studied a pair of food organizations in Seattle, including one led by Rev. Robert Jeffrey. Ramírez describes how the racial makeup of the staffers, the legacy of plantation slavery, and the gentrifying momentum created by "white spaces" affected what the two groups were able to accomplish.

Tues 8.25.15| The Making of American Capitalism

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While it may appear an inevitability, how did capitalism come to take hold in the US? Was slave production in the American South actually capitalist or something else? What was the nature of the Civil War and the emergence of sharecropping in the conflict's wake? Marxist sociologist Charles Post weighs in on these questions, which have been hotly debated for many years on the left, with significant consequences for how we see capitalism's permanence and the nature of racial oppression today.

Mon 8.10.15 | Blacks and the Master/Slave Relation

Frank Wilderson, III, Incognegro: A Memoir of Exile and Apartheid South End Press, 2008

Frank Wilderson, III, Red, White & Black: Cinema and the Structure of U.S. Antagonisms Duke U. Press, 2010

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Frank Wilderson, III, believes that all Blacks are slaves, by which he means that every Black person is socially dead and continuously vulnerable to gratuitous (as opposed to reasoned) violence. Wilderson puts all non-Blacks into the category of the "master," whose sense of human integrity and coherence is maintained precisely by the denigration and physical domination of Blacks.

Mon 8.03.15 | Race, Class, and Hurricanes

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Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy have been recent reminders of the power of massive storms to not only inundate cities and change landscapes, but to reshape or reinforce existing class and racial divisions. Historian Stuart Schwartz reflects on five centuries of hurricanes and conflict in the greater Caribbean, including the Southern United States.

Tues 7.21.15 | Richard Pryor

Scott Saul, Becoming Richard Pryor Harper, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

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Iconoclastic comedian, talented actor, and gifted writer Richard Pryor pushed the boundaries of popular culture at a pivotal moment, laying bare uncomfortable truths about race and injustice in America. Scott Saul reflects on the comedian's formative years in a segregated country and the fluorescence of his art during a time of urban unrest, Black Power, and the counterculture of the 1960s and '70s.

Wed 5.27.15 | Probing “The Wire”

Linda Williams, On The Wire Duke U. Press, 2014

 

 

 

 

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The Wire clearly wasn't your typical police drama. Linda Williams describes the way in which the critically acclaimed television serial about the streets and institutions of Baltimore broke new ground. Among other things, Williams highlights The Wire's institutional focus and argues that the show rewrote what she calls the melodrama of black and white.

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