race

Wed 9.17.14 | Riot in the Suburbs

Phil A. Neel, New Ghettos Burning Ultra

Bristol Radical History Group

 

 

 

 

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Riots can be frightening, violent, chaotic, and indiscriminate. They are also, undoubtedly, moments of collective social power, often of the marginalized. As the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri illustrates, riots are not limited to urban centers, but are increasingly taking place in the suburbs. Roger Wilson and Phil Neel weigh in on the shifting geography and taxonomy of riots. They give differing perspectives on how to understand riots politically. 

Tues 9.09.14 | Food Politics, Race, Capitalism

Aaron Bobrow-Strain, White Bread: A Social History of the Store-Bought Loaf Beacon, 2012

Alison Hope Alkon, Black, White, and Green: Farmers Markets, Race, and the Green Economy, University of Georgia Press, 2012

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The recent job walkouts by fast food workers has been a reminder of the conditions under which people who produce our food labor -- or at least those who make highly processed food. But what about the organic nutritious food sold at farmers markets? Surely things are different there. Or are they? Scholar Aaron Bobrow-Strain looks at the history and blindspots of the alternative food movement. And sociologist Alison Hope Alkon reflects on questions of race, class, and green capitalism.

Tues 8.26.14 | We Are All Criminals

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People with criminal records are, too often, written off by society. Is that fair, asks Emily Baxter, given that we've all violated the law at one time or another? Baxter's project collects and disseminates the stories of crimes people got away with, often because of their class or race privilege.

 

Wed 7.09.14 | When TV Goes Colorblind

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Conservative racial discourse often advances the notion of colorblindness, a notion that Sarah Nilsen sees promoted, ironically, in television shows with distinctly liberal viewing audiences. Nilsen describes the relationship between television and right-wing racial rhetoric; she also examines how race and race relations are portrayed in the hit TV series Mad Men.

Wed 5.28.14 | The American Counter-Revolution?

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Gerald Horne sees the colonists' revolt of 1776 not as a noble struggle for liberty and independence but as a counter-revolution, one waged by this nation's Founding Fathers to defend their right to enslave Africans. The white settlers rose up, argues Horne, in the face of growing evidence that London was moving toward abolition.

Mon 5.26.14 | The Panthers' Medical Activism

Alondra Nelson, Body and Soul: The Black Panther Party and the Fight against Medical Discrimination U. of Minnesota Press, 2011

 

 

 

 

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The Black Panther Party left a rich legacy of militant and innovative organizing. Yet one component of their work is largely forgotten. Sociologist Alondra Nelson discusses the Black Panther Party's medical activism, from setting up free clinics to screening for sickle cell anemia. She situates its work within a long tradition of African American health advocacy and considers its legacy forty years on. (Encore presentation.)

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