global warming

Wed 4.16.14 | Wasting Away

Tristram Stuart, Waste: Uncovering the Global Food Scandal Norton, 2009

 

 

 

 

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Could it be that what we don't eat is destroying our environment? Historian Tristram Stuart argues that the vast amount of food that is wasted by manufacturers, supermarkets, farmers, and consumers -- up to 50 percent of food grown in this country -- has massive ecological consequences, leading to the depletion of the oceans, the decimation of rainforests to grow grains for livestock, and mountains of methane-emitting landfills. (Encore presentation.)

Mon 2.04.13 | The World's Deadliest Invention?

After the lawsuits of the last fifteen years, most people assume that Big Tobacco was dealt a mortal blow. Yet the 21st century is poised to see ten times more deaths than the already mind-boggling number of people who died from cigarettes in the 20th. Historian of science Robert Proctor discusses the contents of cigarettes, which may include arsenic and radioactive polonium amongst other bizarre ingredients, the strange episode of Nazi research into tobacco, and the ways that academics have been bought off by America's most powerful industry.

Wed 11.28.12| The New Genetics; Stopping Coal

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Scientists are some of the most outspoken critics of global warming, with an overwhelming majority of scientists seeing human activity -- such as the burning of coal -- as the main cause of climate change. Yet there are other areas where science is divided. One is over the degree to which our genes determine our lot in life. Radical scientist Steven Rose about the perils of the "new genetics." And Ted Nace reflects on a remarkable grassroots campaign in 2007 to keep coal plants from being built in the United States.

Tues 10.16.12 | The World's Deadliest Invention?

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After the lawsuits of the last fifteen years, most people assume that Big Tobacco was dealt a mortal blow. Yet the 21st century is poised to see ten times more deaths than the already mind-boggling number of people who died from cigarettes in the 20th. Historian of science Robert Proctor discusses the contents of cigarettes, which may include arsenic and radioactive polonium amongst other bizarre ingredients, the strange episode of Nazi research into tobacco, and the ways that academics have been bought off by America's most powerful industry.

Tues 9.18.12 | Halting Global Warming

Gar Lipow, Solving the Climate Crisis through Social Change Praeger Press, 2012


Gar Lipow, Cooling A Fevered Planet CreateSpace, 2012

 

 

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Even after a summer of drought, fires, and extreme weather, governments seem no more inclined to address the enormous dangers of global warming than before. Within parts of the left, pessimism reigns about what it might take, not just politically but technically and socially, to halt climate change. For some, nuclear power seems a necessity; for others, reducing our standard of living is the solution. Left environmental writer Gar Lipow argues against both.

Mon 2.08.10| Climate, Globe, Capital

 

 

 

Global warming is upon us and, without question, immediate action needs to be taken. But should we be asking ourselves who might stand to profit from this moment of crisis?  In an essay prepared for the COP 15 climate meeting, historian Iain Boal addresses the perils of catastrophism and green capitalism.

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