cancer

Mon 10.28.13 | When Doctors Err

S. Lochlann Jain, Malignant: How Cancer Becomes Us UC Press, 2013

S. Lochlann Jain, Injury: The Politics of Product Design and Safety Law in the United States Princeton U. Press, 2006

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Medical error is, by some estimates, the third leading cause of death in the US. So does the medical malpractice system work to compensate patients (or their heirs)? According to Lochlann Jain, that system has been gutted by physicians, by insurance companies, and by lawmakers influenced by industry propaganda.

Mon 11.26.12| Radiation, Cancer, and the Cold War

Ellen Leopold, Under the Radar: Cancer and the Cold War Rutgers University Press, 2009

 

 

 

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In the mid-20th century, the US government and private companies joined together to develop medical applications from the byproducts of the nuclear industry. Ellen Leopold talks about the rise of radiotherapy, experiments on unwitting patients in US hospitals, and the pioneering lawsuit of a Kansas housewife called Irma Natanson, as well as the legacy of the Cold War on cancer detection and treatment today.

Tues 1.25.11| Cancerous Rhetorics?

Metzl & Kirkland, eds., Against Health: How Health Became the New Morality NYU Press, 2010

S. Lochlann Jain, Injury: The Politics of Product Design and Safety Law in the United States Princeton U. Press, 2006

 

Clichés about hope and individual responsibility pervade popular-culture narratives about cancer in the US. Lochlann Jain critiques what she calls "the cultural management of cancer terror" and suggests alternative, more politically conscious ways of discussing disease. She also relates prevailing cancer rhetorics to notions of time, progress, and accumulation under capitalism.

Tues 2.02.10| Radiation, Cancer, and Militarism

Ellen Leopold, Under the Radar: Cancer and the Cold War Rutgers U. Press, 2009

In the mid-20th century, the US government and private companies joined together to develop medical applications from the byproducts of the nuclear industry. Ellen Leopold talks about the rise of radiotherapy, experiments on unwitting patients in US hospitals, and the pioneering lawsuit of a Kansas housewife called Irma Natanson, as well as the legacy of the Cold War on cancer detection and treatment today.
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